What should my learner expect from a Lukeion Project mythology course?

Everything that is assigned to your learner can be found on a full schedule located on the last page of the course syllabus. Learners prepare for quizzes when they become familiar with the assigned readings and conversant with what is presented in class.

Learners must take notes during the live session and while reading assigned passages. Depending on experience in note taking, a parent may need to help beginners develop this skill to avoid unnecessary frustration.

Learners should keep an organized notebook and recopy class notes after each session. Online review games are available on the class web page to help prepare for tests. In addition to multiple choice and matching type questions, learners will write short response essays (2-5 paragraphs) to questions posed on quizzes. Essays ask for analysis and answers to “big picture” issues discussed in class. Details (terms, names, places, etc.) will help learners write an effective essay response and do a good job on the rest of the quiz.

Lukeion Mythology Students will: 1. Complete weekly reading assignments 2. Take online tests including a midterm and final exam 3. Plan and complete one 6-8 page research paper 4. Attend the live session once a week, and participate by asking great questions and offering opinions and answers when asked.

Classical Mythology at The Lukeion Project

 

 

Why study Classical Mythology?

See the February 2013 TOS article by Lukeion founder, Amy Barr:
"3 Myths about Classical Mythology"

Thanks to a number of recent books and movies inspired by Classical mythology, we've witnessed a resurgence of interest in the original Classical myths. What's not to like? Myths range from heroic adventures and true romance to extreme reverses in fortune and tragedy, all with ghastly monsters and divine enchantment. These tales are not bed-time stories nor fairy tales. They explore questions of the human condition, they examine our potential, they expose our reactions to loss and war, and they place supreme value on hospitality, honor, and valor.

Classical mythology has inspired art and literature for over 1700 years. No thinking person can visit capital cities of the western world nor any museum nor library without running headlong into Classical mythology. This makes a study of Classical literature not only a practical course but a requirement for any learner in need of a well rounded education.

The Lukeion Project takes a balanced interdisciplinary approach to Classical mythology

PerseusAn understanding of mythological references will bring to life the finest art and literature of Western civilization. We take our examination of these superb pieces of literature beyond plot and device. Lukeion Mythology presents the greatest works of Classical literature and sets them into their larger historical context as products of cultures which flourished for over a thousand years. Expect a bit of archaeology, geography, geology, vocabulary, and much more. Each class is richly illustrated with a wide variety of art dating from the Mycenaean age (1200 BC) through our modern day.

**The Greeks portrayed male heroes in the nude. I will be selective and never show anything intentionally obscene, but I will not use “fig leaves” either--so be forewarned.

College Preparatory

Red figure_earlyMythology in Classical Literate (Alpha and Beta) are both college preparatory courses.  Each semester usually counts as a half credit literature course in most state transcript systems.  The courses promote time management. They encourage critical analysis in exam essays and research papers. They prompt good note taking and study skills. Good candidates for this course must be confidently reading and writing at the high school level since both the Alpha and Beta course require robust weekly reading assignments. The instructor will provide suggestions and pointers for first time research writers and note takers. 

 

The Lukeion Project Mythology in Classical Literature Alpha

The tourist horse at the site of TroyIn Lukeion Mythology Alpha, we start with a careful study of the ancient Olympians, Prometheus, Pandora, and more. Students will complete the ever popular Olympian Resume writing assignment. Next we discuss the background myths behind the story of Troy, followed by a study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey as well as the Greek tragedy Hecuba.

Students will complete 4-5 quizzes and various writing assignments, including a 6 to 8 page research paper on a topic that they've chosen from a large list of available subjects.

Prerequisites: Recommended for grades 9-12. Students should be reading and writing at the high school level. Suggested companion course: Mythology Beta.

Required texts

Average students will need around 5-7 hours of reading each week--sometimes more for more difficult texts. Translations are important. There are a great many translations of ancient texts, not all are created equal:

  1. Anthology Of Classical Myth: Primary Sources in Translation , Trzaskoma, Smith and Brunet, trans., 2004 (we will not be reading this entire text. Students will find this to be a useful text when completing the writing assignments and we will use this text again in Myth Beta)
  2. Metamorphoses: A New Translation , Charles Martin Trans. (This text will be also be used in Myth Beta).
  3. Medea and Other Plays (Penguin Classics)
  4. Iliad , Stanley Lombardo Trans. (Robert Fagles The Iliad (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition) is also acceptable)
  5. Odyssey , Stanley Lombardo Trans. (Robert Fagles The Odyssey is also acceptable)

We offer a single time slot for this course which is strictly limited in size:

Check course availability
Register for 2014-2015 courses

The Lukeion Project Mythology in Classical Literature Beta

Tragic mask from Aphrodesias, Turkey

In Lukeion Mythology Beta, we will begin with a quick study of the characteristics of the Olympians as review for return students or as a primer for new mythology learners. The first half of the semester will be a careful study of the major heroes of the Classical world: Heracles, Perseus, Theseus, and Jason. We will also study Rome's best hero, Aeneas, with Virgil’s Aeneid. Next we spend a single week on the important play Oedipus Rex by by playwright Sophocles and a single week on Euripides' Medea. We finish the course with a three week study of selections from Ovid’s Metamorphoses.

Students are not required to take Mythology Alpha before they take Mythology Beta, though it is strongly recommended.

Students should anticipate 4-5 exams and a single 6-8 page research paper.

Prerequisites: recommended for 9-12th grade. Students should be reading and writing at the high school level. Suggested companion course: Mythology Alpha.

Required texts

Average students will need around 5-7 hours of reading each week--sometimes more for more difficult texts. Translations are important. There are a great many translations of ancient texts, not all are created equal:

  1. Anthology of Classical Myth: Primary Sources in Translation, Trzaskoma, Smith and Brunet, trans., 2004 (we will not be reading this entire text. Students will find this to be a useful text when completing the writing assignments and we will use this text again in Myth Beta)
  2. Ovid Metamorphoses, Charles Martin Trans.
  3. Virgil, Aeneid translation by Robert Fagles
  4. Euripides, Medea, choose any modern translation
  5. Sophocles, Oedipus the King, choose any modern translation

We offer a single time slot for this course which is strictly limited in size:

Check course availability
Register for 2014-2015 courses